Boundary Gallery | David Breuer-Weil
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David Breuer-Weil

1965-Present

Widely known for his engaging critique of the human condition, Breuer-Weil unsettles our expectations; known chiefly for his monumental canvases, his paintings and drawings provide a tragic and moving comment on such issues as homelessness, asylum seeking and natural catastrophes. The viewer is unsettled by the constant dialogue between tragedy and comedy, weight and weightlessness, large and small scales. However, the themes are secondary to the formal qualities of the works which have become increasingly textured, raw and painterly.

His work provides a biting satire of the most current issues, in the sculptures Blunkett & Son (showing the blind and disgraced minister failing to placate a screaming child). Two sculptures of Tony Blair explore the idea of authenticity and betrayal. Tony’s Holiday shows the PM, with two faces, dancing on an Egyptian pyramid sticking up two fingers to the world, surrounded by Tsunami waves whilst Tony Taxman shows the former leader as a devil with two horns made of pound signs, a reflection of fiscal manipulation. Whilst Breuer-Weil’s earlier sculptures (also on view) were made out of extremely heavy smashed and re-assembled rocks, timeless images of pre-historic man, these new more overtly political works are made of almost weightless polystyrene, mirroring the fleeting and insignificant nature of scandal. This theme is further explored in a series of fifteen paintings titled News which show figures obsessively surrounded by the tools of modern media: newspapers, magazines and televisions.